Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Tutorial’ Category

From this:

studio-dec-08-010400

to this:

office-chair-recoverThis took about 3 hours, start to finish (oops plus the 5 days to get the 2nd yard of fabric sent!) What’s neat about this project is that it’s an easy introduction into both upholstery (for the seat) and slipcovering (for the back) and takes a blah black office chair to WOW!

What I used:

  • 2 yards of decorator weight fabric (my choice designed by the fabulous Jessica Jones, available to purchase at J. Caroline)
  • 1 yard lining fabric
  • a 1″ thick piece of high density foam that’s 0.5-1″ larger than the seat on all sides
  • fluffy dacron batting cut 2″ wider  on all sides
  • muslin cut a good 4″ wider on all sides

Tools you’ll need:

  • Scissors
  • Sewing machine
  • Pins
  • Staple gun

Now, I’ve done a few upholstery projects before with a manual staple gun, and I’ve had to have my husband help me with that part – my hand gives out after about 10 staples, and there’s lots of times we have to pull out and reshoot the staple because it didn’t seat properly. When I started wrapping quilts around a frame, I almost went insane. BUT since I was making a little bit of money with my little business, my hubby went to a local auto upholstery supply store and bought me a pneumatic upholstery stapler:

Rainco R1B 50-16 50 series upholstery stapler

Rainco R1B 50-16 50 series upholstery stapler

Seriously, one of the best $125 we’ve ever spent! Of course, this requires a compressor to run, but my hubby has hobbies too, so we’ve already got one of these! We’ve also got a long hose for the compressor, so I can wheel the compressor into the laundry and shut the door, the hose comes under the door, this keeps the noise down.

I’ve created a tutorial filled with photos over at Flickr, go take a look! I describe what’s happening in each picture – make sure to go to the slideshow options and check “always show title and description” in order to see the text along with the picture.

This is my 1st real tutorial, I hope it makes sense. There’s a couple of pictures I wish I had taken, but I can’t go back and take them now! Please let me know if you have any questions, and I’d love to see what you make if you use this tutorial!

Read Full Post »

So, the upside of my little business is that I have made enough money to completely cover all my material expenses, plus I’ve been able to purchase a new camera (a Nikon D40) and a new Sewing Machine – a Juki TL-98Q. Yay! But now I needed a table that could fit both machines at once, or one at a time. For 2 reasons, 1) money and 2) function, my DH has made me the perfect sewing machine table!

Tah Dah! As always – click any picture to embiggen!

It is 2' x 6', with an extension hinged across the back to make it a full 4' deep when I want (the extensions that hold that up aren't built yet, but Rome wasn't built in a day either...) It is 28" high with leveling feet that allow up to another 1" in height if needed. There is also a 12" deep shelf running across the back to hold either the machine covers or the machines themselves.

2x4's braced with plywood pieces at the junctions. There is a 12" deep shelf running across the back.

Table frame: 2x4's braced with plywood pieces at the junctions. There is a 12" deep shelf running across the back.

Measuring

Measuring

Holes Cut

Holes Cut

Shelf

Shelf

Lots of drywall screws, counter sunk, then later filled with spackle.

Lots of drywall screws, counter sunk, then later filled with spackle.

The Juki with the brass plate set into the worktop and held in place with some rare earth magnets. I can fit my finger into the fingerhole of the plate on the machine, flip the brass plate over, then access the bobbin area.

The Juki with the brass plate set into the worktop and held in place with some rare earth magnets. I can fit my finger into the fingerhole of the plate on the machine, flip the brass plate over, then access the bobbin area.

Here the brass plate is flipped over - you can see the magnets coutner sunk and plenty of room to access the bobbin.

Here the brass plate is flipped over - you can see the magnets counter sunk and plenty of room to access the bobbin.

Bernina

Bernina sits just proud of the table and the table that came with it covers up the hole. This system worked really well with my old table and saves the $$ for the plexiglass insert. See my July 6 post.

We stapled some velcro ties underneath to control the cords.

We stapled some velcro ties underneath to control the cords.

My DH created a "mini-table" insert for the Bernina hole.
My DH created a “mini-table” insert for the Bernina hole.
A crefully fit plywood top with 2x4 bits underneath. Those are adjustable chair legs crewed into the bottom, so we could get the  top totally flush.

A carefully fit plywood top with 2x4 bits underneath. Those are adjustable chair legs screwed into the bottom, so we could get the top totally flush.

With the "mini-table" in place, I can use the surface for cutting, or it will support a large quilt when I'm quilting.

With the "mini-table" in place, I can use the surface for cutting, or it will support a large quilt when I'm quilting.

Even more pictures of this whole process are here…if you need to show the handy person in the house “Just how Candy’s husband did it” so they too can build you the perfect sewing table!
With the addition of one more set of drawers for my fused fabric little bits my studio works very well!

With the addition of one more set of drawers for my fused fabric little bits my studio works very well!

This new table is a bit narrower, so when I open up the cutting table all the way, there's room to walk all the way around.

This new table is a bit narrower, so when I open up the cutting table all the way, there's room to walk all the way around.

These drawers were repurposed to hold all my thread.

These drawers were repurposed to hold all my thread.

I can also create an ironing surface by placing my large board across a small set of rolling shelves (balance carefully) Then I can cut & press side by side.

I can also create an ironing surface by placing my large board across a small set of rolling shelves (balance carefully) Then I can cut & press side by side.

I always enjoy seeing where people work, so I’m glad that 1) I’ve got such a great place to work and 2) that I can show it off to you! This is not a large room, but with most things on wheels, I can reconfigure it depending on how I need the space! This is working really well for me.

Read Full Post »